Citizen Keane

By: Adam Parfrey and Cletus Nelson

The weeping big-eyed Keane waifs epitomized kitsch art in 1960s America. Postcards and posters cluttered millions of American homes, and later, thrift stores.

Adam Parfrey’s 1990 cover story on the Keanes inspired fascination with “big eye” art among lowbrow painters and collectors. This expanded, book-length version includes archival photos and color reproductions of Keane and their imitators.

The strange saga of Margaret and Walter Keane, which ended in a court battle, will also be the subject of a forthcoming Tim Burton film “Big Eyes”… The same screenwriters behind “Big Eyes” are also the ones who wrote “Ed Wood,” based on the Feral House book, Nightmare of Ecstasy: The Life and Art of Edward D. Wood, Jr.




By: Elana Freeland

It’s no great secret. There are many examples in this country’s history in which citizens are victims of misguided scientific ideas. Today, the U.S. military has aerial chemical and biological experiments on civilians to “own the weather” through geo-engineering programs promoted as godsends to climate change. Chemtrails lays out the military’s distressing plan for “full spectrum dominance.”




Republican Party Animal coverRepublican Party Animal

By: David Cole

In the 1990s, David Cole was in the news as a Jewish Holocaust revisionist. After a $25,000 bounty was put on his head by a violent extremist group, he faked his own death and reemerged as David Stein, popular Republican organizer, working alongside the biggest and most secretive GOP names in politics and Hollywood, before being “outed” in 2013.




WHCG_CoverWhite House Call Girl

By: Phil Stanford

This Spring we are presenting the print version of this Fall’s eBook exclusive White House Call Girl. Heidi Rikan was a stripper, working for the mob in Washington, D.C. White House Call Girl tells how a call girl operation she was running at the time led to the Watergate break-in and brought down the 37th President of the United States, Tricky Dick Nixon himself. We’ve got photos. What’s more, we’ve got Heidi’s little black book.




POP coverPacific Ocean Park

By: Christopher Merritt and Domenic Priore

Southern California attractions faced stiff competition in 1958 when Pacific Ocean Park was built in Venice, once called “The Coney Island of the West.” P.O.P. delivered a fantastical futuristic-themed amusement park in Los Angeles’ ’50s/’60s heyday. Before the huge attraction was razed and burned apocalyptically, skateboard pioneers and psychedelic ballrooms became part of its hedonistic thrill.